ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS

ETHICALCONSIDERATIONS

 

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Asresearchandwritingbegins,anumberofethicalissuesneedtobe considered.Graduate studentsatUCareexpected toadheretothehigheststandardsofethicalaccountability.

 

 

 

Authorship

 

Projectsarenormallyunderstoodtobeindividualendeavors.Inspecialcircumstance,however, collaborationmaybeconsideredwhenitcanbe shownthatthismaysignificantlybenefitthefinal productorthestudent’slearning experience.Nevertheless,studentswhoworktogetherarerequiredto produceseparatedocumentsthatreflectuniquecontributionstotheoveralleffort,alongwith collectivelyproducedmaterialsuch asdataorconclusions.

Sincethepurposeofaprojectincludeshands-onexperienceineachstageofits conceptualizationandexecution,studentsareexpected toparticipatedirectlyineveryaspectofthe process.Requestsforpermissiontocollaborate mustbesubmittedinwriting.Finalapprovalisobtained fromthestudent’sadvisorandthedeanoftheappropriateschool.

Plagiarism

 

Itisunderstoodthatallofthewriting(bothwordingandideas) intheprojectisthestudent’s own,unlessappropriateattributionismade.Failuretoreferenceproperly,eventhoughunintended, constitutesplagiarism,  aswellaspoorscholarship.

Research withHumanParticipants

 

Specialconsideration mustbeappliedwhenundertaking researchwithhumanparticipants. Generalprinciplesincludeinformedconsent,freedomtodeclinetoparticipate,freedomfrommentalor physicaldiscomfort,debriefingattheconclusionoftheresearchproject,andtherighttoconfidentiality.

Beforeproceeding,thestudentmustcheckwiththeUCInstitutionalReviewBoardtodetermine ifapprovalisneeded.

 

PROCEDURALOUTLINE

 

Itisimportantthatthestudentmaintain communicationwithhis/herprojectadvisor throughout thecoursework.Thefollowingsequenceoutlineswhatistobedoneateachstage. A.SemesterbeforeProjectEnrollment:

  1. 1. Scheduleameetingwithyouradvisorearlyinthesemesterinwhichyouintendtocompletethe courseworDiscusspossibletopicsfortheprojectandconsiderpotentialadvisorsand committeemeetings.
  2. 2. DownloadacopyoftheProjectHandbookfromhttp://www.unionky.edu/

 

  1. 3. Registerfortheone-unitProjectproposalcourse(XXX)tobecompletedthefollowingsemeste

 

B.Semesterinwhichthestudentbeginstoworkontheproject/project:

 

  1. 1. RegistrationforProjectProposal(XXX)initiatesaformalreviewof the student’s coursework by the Registrar’s Office.
  2. At the end of the semester, the advisor and committee will decide whether to grant final approval of the project proposal. If the proposal is not approved, the student will need to re- enroll in XXX.
  3. Upon successful completion of XXX, the student may enrolld in PSYH 696,Integrative Project Ifor 3 units.

 

C.SemestersinprogressontheProject:

 

Thestudentwillhavetwosemesterstocompletehis/herIntegrativeProjectfollowingsuccessful completionoftheproposal. ThefirstsemesterthestudentwillbeenrolledinPSYH696, IntegrativeProjectI,andthesecondsemesterthestudentwillbeenrolledinPSYH697, IntegrativeProjectII.Itis expectedthattheprojectwillbecompleteattheendofthesecondsemester.

 

D.SemesterofcompletionofProject:

 

  1. 1. Atthebeginningofthetermduringwhichthestudentplans tocompletetheproject,the ApplicationforMaster’s Degree is submitted to the Registrar’s Office. This form initiatesevaluation forboththetranscript,andpostingofthedegreeandcommencementparticipation.
  2. 2. Theproject must be approved for content by the student’s projectadviso

 

  1. 3. Whentheadvisorandthecommitteearesatisfiedwiththeprojectandhavesignedoffonthe contentontheprojectcoversheet,thestudentwillturntheprojectintotheDepartmentof PsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnelaminimumofsixweekspriortotheendofthe semestWhilethesix-weektimeframemaynotbe feasibleforthesummersession,itremains the student’s responsibilitytohavethecontentapprovedprojectturnedinwithsufficienttime forsteps4-6tobecompletedbytheendofthesemester.
  2. 4. TheProjectadvisorwillassigntheprojecttoauniversityreader,whowilldeterminewhetheror notthemanuscriptisreadyforfinalsignaturesandbinding.Ifitisdeterminedthatthe manuscriptisnotready,theDepartmentofPsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnelwillnotify thestudWhentherequiredcorrectionshavebeencompleted,themanuscriptwillbe returnedtothereader.Thisprocesswillberepeateduntilthereaderapprovesthemanuscript.
  3. 5. Followingreaderapprovalofthemanuscript,thestudentwillsubmitthreecopiestothe DepartmentofPsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnelonbinderyqualitypaper(seeAppendix D) and one copy on CD or flash drive. Additional copies may be submitted for binding at this time. The Department of Psychology Academic Support personnelwillnotifythecommittee membersandtheappropriatedeanforfinalsignatureThestudentwillbenotifiedwhenall signatureshavebeenobtained,andthemanuscriptwillbesentforbinding.Thestudentwillbe notifiedwhenboundcopiesareavailable.Thestudent,theprojectdirector,andthelibrarywill eachreceiveaboundcopy.

 

  1. 6. Thestudentmusthavemanuscriptapprovalfromthereader,allcommitteemembers,andthe dean oftheappropriateschoolinordertoreceivetranscriptcreditfortheProjectbytheendof the semester. These requirements must be met by the last day of the full-term. It is the student’s responsibility to submit the manuscript six weeks prior to the end of the semester. This should allow sufficient time tomakeanynecessarycorrectionsandcompletetheapproval procesItisuptothestudent, however,tomakecorrectionsinatimelymanner.

E.ParticipationinCommencement:

 

Commencementisheldonceayear,inMay.Thestudentmayparticipateifhe/shehas completedthedegreeorisregisteredwiththeintenttocompletedegreerequirementswithinthe semesterinwhichhe/sheplanstoparticipate.He/shemustalsohaveobtainedall finalapprovalsonthe project.TheprojectmustbeturnedintotheDepartmentofPsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnela minimum of six weeks prior to the end of the semester, with content approval already acquired. It is the student’s responsibility, however, to make corrections as required  by the university reader in a timely fashion. Be advised that participating in commencement, in and of itself, does not cause the registrar tomakenotationonthestudent’stranscript. Projectcreditisrecordedafterthedean oftheappropriate schoolsignsthemanuscriptandsemestergradesare recorded.Theactualpostingofthedegreeoccurs followingthecompletionofallcourserequirementsandafinalevaluationbythe Registrar’s Office.

 

APPENDICES

 

AppendixA:Committee&Advisor

 

Thefollowingsectionsdescribetheselectionandfunctioningoftheprojectadvisor.

 

AppointmentofProjectCommittee

 

Theprojectisundertakenundertheguidanceofaprojectadvisorandcommittee,whoareappointed andapprovedbythedepartmentchair.Thecommittee is composed of the student’s project advisor (who also serves as chair) and at least one additional UCfacultymemberselectedbythestudentand theadvisorandapprovedbythedepartmentchair.

Advisor/CommitteeFunctions

 

Theroleoftheadvisoristoworkwiththestudentthroughouttheentireprocess,including selection,determinationofprocedures,andpreparationofthefinalproduct,inadditiontohelping ensurealldiscipline-specificrequirementsaremet.OthermembersoftheProjectCommitteemayalso serveinanongoingadvisingcapacity attherequestoftheadvisororthestudent.Theywillneedto approvetheproposalandultimately signoffonthecompletedproject.

 

AppendixB:Standards&Expectations

 

General Considerations

 

Allwritingmustbecoherent,logical,andeasytofollow,keepingtheaudienceinmind. Transitionstohelptheaudiencefollowtheflowofthepresentationmustbeprovided.Argumentsor positionspresented mustbeclearlysupported.Unsubstantiatedgeneralizationsmustbeavoided. Organizationisacriticalcomponentofclearwriting.Ithelpsthereaderunderstandthecentralideaof whatisbeingwrittenand providesalogicalsequenceofcommunication.

StylisticandMechanicalRequirements

 

ThestyleandmechanicsofthedocumentshouldfollowtheAmericanPsychologicalAssociation

 

Manual,6thedition.

 

DocumentRequirements

 

Paper.Paperforthefinalcopiesmustbe20-pound whitebondacid-freepaper.

 

Font, style, and size. The student is encouraged to makeuseofcomputerwordprocessingin writingtheproject.Oneofthefollowingfontsshouldbeused:Arial,Courier,Geneva,Helvetica,or TimesNewRoman.Usea12-pointfontsize.

Printqualityandcorrections.Alltypemustbesharp,clear,and unbroken.Thetypemustbe blackandconsistentlydarkthroughout.Dotmatrixprintingisnotacceptable.

Margins.Marginsaretobesetat1-1/2”fortheleftmargin and1”forthetop,right,and bottom.

Pagenumbers.Allpagesarenumbered inthebottom,centerposition.

 

PageSequence.Thepagesofthefinalcopyofthedocumentshouldfollowthesequencelisted below:(SeeAppendixDforsamplepages.)

  • TitlePage

 

  • ApprovalPage

 

  • AuthorizationforReproductionPage

 

  • AcknowledgmentsPage(optional)

 

  • PermissiontoCirculatePage

 

  • Abstract

 

  • TableofContents

 

  • TableofFigures(ifapplicable)

 

  • Chapters

 

  • ReferencePage

 

  • Appendix/Appendices(if applicable)

 

Appendixspacing.Anappendix(orappendices)maybesingleordoublespaced,dependingon thenatureofthematerial.EachappendixshouldbetitledandlistedintheTableofContents.Itis acceptabletointroducelengthyappendiceswithtitlepages;theseshouldconformtothetitlepage providedintheappendixtothishandbook.

Abstract.Anabstractisabrief,comprehensivesummaryofthecontentsoftheproject.Itgives readersanoverviewofallthekeyideasyoupresent.Itisgenerallyoneparagraph,and itshouldnot exceed500words(seesampleabstractinsamplepagesofthishandbook).Agoodabstractisaccurate: Itreflectsexactlywhatisintheproject;itisself-contained; itdefinesanytechnicaltermsandavoids usinganyacronymsorabbreviations;itisconciseandspecific;anditisbriefandtothepoint.Normally, anabstractiswrittenafterthemanuscriptisotherwisecomplete.

References.Everyreferencecitedinthetextmustappearinthereference list(usuallycalled “References”) that follows the body of the paper. By the same token, all entries in the reference list must have been cited inthe text. References are presented in alphabetical order by author, using a “hanging indent” to separate entries. Note that all types of reference materials appear in a single list

 

(e.g.,journals,books,unpublishedpapers,etc.).Referencesareindividuallysingle-spacedanddouble- spacedbetweenreferences.

Blockquotations.Aquotation offortyormorewords shouldbecitedinblockquotationstyle. Thequotationissingle-spacedandisseparatedfromthesurroundingtextbydouble-spacingbeforeand after.Thewholequotation,notjustthefirstline,isindentedfivespacesfromtheleftmargin.Thereare noquotationmarksaroundtheblock.Ifthereisasecondaryquotewithintheblock,usequotation marksaroundthesecondaryquoteonly.Thein-textcitationappearsattheendoftheblock.

Tables.Forasampleoftables,consultthetablesectionoftheAPAManual, pagesxxx-zzz. Adheretothefollowingguidelineswhenconstructingatable:

  • Themainrule for tables is that they be concise and as clear as possible. Try to keep headings for columns and rows to no more than three words.
  • Allfiguresshouldbeproperlyalignedaccordingtothelastnumberineachfigure.

 

  • Allmajorwordsshouldbecapitalized.

 

  • Tableswithinthetextshouldbeprecededandfollowedbytwodouble-spacedlines.

 

  • All tables shouldbeunderlinedbyasinglelineextendingthelengthofthetable.Row headingsdonotneedtobeunderlined.
  • Thelastrowofthetableshouldalsobeunderlinedbyasinglelineextendingthelength ofthetable.
  • Forlengthyandcomplextables,additionallinesmaybeusediftheyenhanceclarity.

 

  • Fortablestakenfromanothersource, thecitationshouldbeplacedonthelinefollowing theunderlinedfinalrow.Thecitationshouldbeincorrect APAstyle,e.g.,(Smith,2006,

p.100).

 

Attachmentstotheproject.Non-standardandnon-printmaterials(e.g.,videooraudiocassettes, software,charts,posters,etc.)maybeincludedaspartoftheproject,whentheyareclearlyidentifiedas

 

beingintegraltoit.Postersoroversizedcharts shouldbefoldedandboundintothestandardproject copy,ifpossible.Disksandcassettesmustbesubmittedtothelibrarywiththemanuscript.

Coloredprint.Becauseoftheadditionalprocessingrequired,coloredprintsarediscouragedand maybeacceptedonlywithappropriateadvanceapproval.

ExceptionstoAPA format

 

ChapterXXXXoftheAPAManual 6thEd.coverstherulesfortheses,andUC’sproject requirementsaretaken fromthere.Thereare twoexceptionsinwhichtheCollegerequirementsdiffer fromtheAPAManual. First,running titlesarenotusedforaestheticreasons.Second,headingstylesare set,ratherthanvariable,foralllevels.Properlyformatted headingstylesare displayedonthefollowing page.

LevelHeadings

 

Level1:ChapterHeadings.Chapterheadingsarecenteredandtypedinallcapitalletters.New chaptersalwaysbeginonanewpage.Thebodyoftextbeginsonthethirddouble-spacedlineandis indentedattheleftmargin,whiletheremainderoftheparagraphisjustifiedwiththeleftmargin.

Level2:MainHeadings.Mainheadingscorrespond tomajordivisionsofapaperwithina chapter.Theyare centeredand typedincapitalandsmallletters,withmajorwordsbeginningin capitals,andareseparatedfromthetextthatprecedesand followsthembyadouble-spacedline.

Level3:SideHeadings.Sideheadingsbeginontheleftmarginandareitalicized.Themainwords beginwithcapitals.Sideheadingsareseparatedfromtheprecedingtextbyadouble-spacedline.The textresumeson thenextdouble-spacedlineandisindented.

Level4:paragraph headings.Paragraphheadingsareindented anditalicized,withonlythe initialletterofthefirstwordcapitalized.Theparagraphheadingendswithaperiod,and thetextbegins withoutextraspacing.Thereisnoseparationfromtheprecedingtext.

 

Appendix C:References

 

Bothfinalbibliographicandin-textcitationshouldfollowtheAPA6theditionguidelines.Below arelistedexamplesofsomeofthemostcommontypesofreferencesandcitations.ConsulttheAPA manualforamorecomprehensivelistofexamples.

FinalReferences

 

A.Journalarticle

 

Goldenberg, C.(1996). Theeducationoflanguage-minoritystudents:Wherearewe,andwheredowe needtogo?TheElementarySchoolJournal,96(3),353-361.

 

B.Magazinearticle

 

Chen,A.(2005,September19).Growingthreat.SportsIllustrated,103, 114-116.(putdateshownon magazine–monthformonthliesandmonthanddayforweeklies)

 

C.Newspaperarticle

 

Schwartz,J.(1993,September30).Obesityaffectseconomics,socialstatus.TheWashingtonPost,pp.

A1,A4.

 

D.Book

 

Garcia,E.(1992). Studentculturaldiversity:Understandingandmeetingthechallenge(2nded.).Boston: HoughtonMifflin.

 

E.Editedbook

 

Ada,A.F.(Ed.).(1993).Thepoweroftwolanguages.NewYork:Macmillan/McGrawHill.

 

F.Chapterinanedited book

 

Bjork,R.A.(1989).Retrieval inhibitionas anadaptivemechanism inhumanmemory.InH.L.RoedigerIII

&F. IM.Craik(Eds.),Varietiesofmemoryandconsciousness(pp.309-330).Hillsdale,NJ: Eribaum.

 

G.Report

 

Mead,J.V.(1992).Lookingatoldphotographs:Investigatingtheteachertalesthatnoviceteachersbring withthem(ReportNo.NCRTL-RR-92-4).EastLansing,MI:National CenterforResearchon Teacherlearning.(ERICDocumentReproductionServiceNo.ED346082)

 

H.ElectronicSources

 

Ataminimum,areferenceofanInternetsourceshouldprovideadocumenttitleordescription, adate(eitherthedateofpublicationorupdateorthedateofretrieval),andaddress.Theaddress(URL) isthemostcriticalelement.Forexample,areportwouldbelisted likethis:

UniversityofCalifornia,SanFrancisco,InstituteforHealthandAging.(1996,November).Chroniccarein America:A21stcenturychallenge.Retrieved September9,2000, fromtheRobertWood JohnsonFoundationWebsite:http://www.rwjf.org/library/chrcare/

 

See theAPAManual foradditionalexamples.

 

In-textreferences

 

Ifthecitationistoageneralsource,identifytheauthoranddate.

 

Walker(2000)foundthat…

 

Inarecentstudy(Walker,2000),itwasreportedthat…

 

Ifaquotation isincluded,putthepagenumberofthequotationinyourtext:

 

Walker(2000)reportedthat“reactiontimesvariedaccordingtostimuli”(p.21).

 

Inarecentstudy,itwasnotedthat“reactiontimesvariedaccordingtostimuli”(Walker,

 

2000,p.21).

 

Notethatifthecitationcomesattheendofasentence,theperiodgoesaftertheparentheses, notattheendofthequotation.

Ifanauthor discussesastudyorincludesaquotationfromanotherbookorarticle,namethe originalsourceandgiveacitationforthesecondarysource,theoneactuallyread.Forexample,ifan articlebyKrashenincludesaquotationfromElley,thein-textcitationwould looklikethis:

(ElleyascitedinKrashen,1992,p. 31).

 

If Elley’s study is being cited without using a direct quotation, your paper would read: This is shown in the study by Elley (as cited in Krashen, 1992).

In either case, list Krashen, not Elley, in the final references.

 

Aquotationoffortyormorewordsshouldbecitedinblockquotationstyle.Thequotationstarts onanewlineand isdouble-spaced.Thewholequotation, notjustthefirstline, isindentedfivespaces fromtheleftmargin.Therearenoquotationmarksaroundtheblock.Ifthereisasecondaryquote

withintheblock,usequotationmarksaroundthesecondaryquoteonly.Thein-textcitationappearsat theendoftheblock.ForexamplesofblockquotationstylerefertotheAPAManual 6thEd.,pagesXYZ andZYX.

 

AppendixD:SamplePages

 

Thefollowing pagesshowsamples ofproperlyformattedpagesthatneedtobeincludedinthe manuscript.

 

a.SampleTitlePage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WRITINGSTRATEGIESFORGIFTEDSTUDENTS

 

 

 

 

AMaster’sProject

Presentedto theFacultyof UnionCollege

 

 

 

InPartialFulfillment

oftheRequirementsforthe

MasterofArtsDegree

 

 

 

By

JohnK.Doe

June2012

 

b.SampleApprovalPage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

College.

AcceptedinpartialfulfillmentoftherequirementsfortheMasterofArtsDegreeatUnion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CommitteeChair

 

 

 

 

CommitteeMember

 

 

 

 

Dean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ii

 

c.AuthorizationOptions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thewritermaychooseoneofthefollowingoptionsfortheauthorizationforreproduction page

 

(seenextpagefortheproperformat).

 

Igrantpermissionforthereproductionofthisprojectinitsentirety,withoutfurtherauthorizationfrom me,ontheconditionthatthepersonoragencyrequestingreproduction absorbsthecostandprovides acknowledgmentofauthorship.

 

Igrantpermissionforthereproductionofpartsofthisprojectwithoutfurtherauthorizationfromme, ontheconditionthatthepersonoragencyrequestingreproduction absorbsthecostandprovides acknowledgmentofauthorship.

 

Permissiontoreproducethisprojectinitsentiretymustbeobtained fromtheauthor. Permissiontoreproducepartsofthisprojectmustbeobtainedfromtheauthor. Reproductionofthisprojecteitherinpartorinitsentiretyisprohibited.

Iherebyreserveallrightsofpublication,includingtherighttoreproduce thisproject,inanyform,fora periodofthreeyearsfromthisdate.

 

d.SampleAuthorizationforReproductionPage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Igrantpermissionforthereproductionofthisprojectinitsentirety,withoutfurtherauthorizationfrom me,ontheconditionthatthepersonoragencyrequestingreproduction absorbsthecostandprovides acknowledgmentofauthorship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signature

 

 

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iii

 

  1. SampleAcknowledgmentPage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

IwouldliketogratefullythankCherieDillon,GeriBaker,LorettaTrotter,PamHuffman,Brenda

James,AliceTemple, and Anne Reddingforalltheirhelpinfieldtestingmyinvestigations…….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iv

 

f.SamplePermissiontoCirculatePage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IgrantWeeks-TownsendMemorialLibrarypermissiontomakethisprojectavailableforuseby itsown patrons,aswellasthoseofthebroadercommunitythroughinter-libraryloan.

Thisuseisunderstood tobewithinthelimitationsofcopyright.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signature

 

 

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

v

 

g.SampleAbstractPage

 

ABSTRACT

 

LargenumbersofstudentsinEnglish-speakingcountriesenterelementaryschoolsspeakinglittleorno English.Areviewoftheresearchinsecondlanguageacquisitionand effectiveschoolingreveals widespreadagreementontheprinciplesthatunderliesuccessfulprogramsforthesestudents.However, severalfactorshavelimitedtheimplementationofsuchprograms.Thischapterreviewsthetheoryand researchthatsupportsprogramsthatleadtoacademicsuccessforEnglishlearners.Thefactorsthat preventthedevelopmentofsuccessfulprogramsarethenconsidered.Theseincludean emphasison standardsandtesting,alackofprimarylanguagesupport,afailuretodistinguishamongtypesofEnglish learners,andashortageofteacherspreparedtoworkwithEnglishlearners.Fourkeysforacademic success for English learners are presented: 1.) Engage students  in challenging, theme-based curriculum to develop academic concepts; 2.) Draw on students’ background – their experiences, cultures, and languages; 3.) Organize collaborative activities and scaffold instruction to build students’ academic English proficiency;  and 4.) Create confident  students who value school and value themselves as learners. Each key is explained and illustrated. Curriculum based on these keys provides elementary English learners withthe greatest likelihood of academic success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vi

 

h.SampleTableofContentsPage

 

TABLEOFCONTENTS

 

TABLEOFCONTENTS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….v

 

LISTOFFIGURES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………viii

 

CHAPTER1INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………….1

PurposeofStudy……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………..3

Application………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………4

EstablishedDescription…………………………………………………………………..……………………………………………5

SignificanceofResearch……………………………………………………………..………………………………………………..6

ProblemStatement………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………8

Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..13

 

 

 

CHAPTER2REVIEWOFTHELITERATURE…………………………………………………………………….………….………………15

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….……………………15

TheTenCharacteristicsofServant Leadership…………………………………………………….……………………….27

TheEssenceoftheLeader…………………………………………………………………………………………..……………….32

TheIntegrityofaLeader………………………………………………………………………………………………………………33

TheLeaderasaSteward………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………..39

 

CHAPTER3METHODOLOGY……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………53

Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…53

ResearchDesignandProcedures………………………………………………………………………………………………..60

Instrumentation……………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………..62

DataCollection…………………………………………………………………………………………….……………………………..64

ProcessofAnalysis………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………70

Summary……………………………………………………………………………………..………………………………………………72

 

CHAPTER4PRESENTATIONANDANALYSISOFTHEDATA…………………………………………………………………………74

Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………74

Presentation ofData……………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………75

Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………96

 

REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………..99

 

APPENDICES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………..…103

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vii

 

i.SampleNewChapterPage

(bypermissionofConstanceA.Crowley)

 

CHAPTER 1

 

BetweenFebruary25 and April8, 1988, asmall group of individuals in the rural Midwest shifted from beingapastoralgroupof theCommunityof Christto becoming a fervent sect.It was duringthis time that theself-appointed high priest of Communityfirst retreatedfrom the world and then returned to his groupto reportamessagefrom God.

 

And thepower of God was upon me. Not ashredofthe adversarywas anywhere in sight.Iwas totallychangedandIreceived mystrength back again. TheLord had an urgencyanda feelingof battleIhad neverbeforefeltin God orman. . .

.AndIstood in thepowerof God. And the angels who wereguardingtherecords heard and took note. . . .AndIcalledforth therecords [the “original writings (that) haveon them the wayto theHolyCity”] foryou. . . .And [God]said,

“Stand forth as aPriest of theMostHigh Godandtell theguardians of therecords to bringthem forth toyou to interpret toyour people. . .Iaskedforthat alittle hesitatingly, butIobeyed. . . .WhatIasked forwas directlyfrom Himpersonally with His urgency.I certainlypaid theprice.Ipromised to do the hard repentance.

. . .Howmanytimes hasHetoldyou thatyouare out of time?Remember what you are goingto repent of. You haveto makepreparations to come out of Babylon. Remember Hesaid, “Ifyou partakeof her sinsyou shallreceiveofher

plagues.” TheLord said,“Ishall sparenonethat remain in Babylon.”(High

Priest, 1988)

 

 

 

Thus, in Aprilof 1988, when this splinter group(hereafterreferred to as theCommunity) was formedand began its retreat from what it viewed as Babylon, a ferventsect was born that manypeople in the surroundingcommunities would refer toas a cult.

Over thedecades, the definition ofthe termculthas changed.In 1971, theterm was defined as“worship;reverential homagerenderedto a divine beingor beings…a particularform orsystem ofreligious worship; especiallyin referenceto its external rites and ceremonies

…devotion orhomagetoaparticular person or thing”(Weiner&Simpson, 1971).

 

 

 

 

viii

 

ii.SampleReferencePage

 

REFERENCES

 

A collectiveof women: Sex, lies andgrand schemes. (1997).Cultic Studies Journal, 14, 58–84. Aaslid, F. S. (2003). On theoutsidelookingin:Growingup in theMoonies.Cultic Studies

Review, 2, 1–8.

 

High Priest (Speaker). 1988.Calling forththe records[Sermon cassette tape]. Marion: Brotherhood ofChristChurch.

Lalich, J. (2000). Bounded choice: Thefusion of personalfreedom and self-renunciation in two transcendent groups.Unpublisheddoctoral dissertation, Fielding Institute,Santa Barbara, California.

O’Donnell, T. R. (1993,May2).ISU settles lawsuitover thesisabout commune.TheDes

 

Moines SundayRegister,p. 6B.

 

Rosedale, H.L.,&Langone, M. D. (2004).On using theterm“cult”.Retrieved December 17,

 

2004 from http://culticstudies.org/infoserv_cult101/essay_cult.htm Russell, W. E. (2003). Zion is established near Lamoni. Unpublished manuscript. Stark, R., &Bainbridge,W. S. (1987).A theory of religion.New York: DavidLang. Taylor, A. (1986).Treasureseekingin theAmerican Northeast, 1780–1830. American

Quarterly, 38, 6–34.

 

Troeltsch, E. (1931). Thesocial teaching ofthe Christian churches.London: Allen &Unwin. (Original work published1911)

Weber, M. (1946). Thesociologyofcharismaticauthority.In H. H.Gerth&C. W. Mills (Eds.), From MaxWeber: Essays in sociology(pp. 245–252).New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Appendix E:EditorialProcess

 

Responsibilityforthequalityofwritingandeditingoftheprojectlieswiththestudent, who workscloselywithhis/heradvisorduringtheentirewritingprocess.TheCollegeprovidesa“reader” whoreviewsthemanuscriptforeditorialcorrectness.Ifthereaderdetermines thatthemanuscript requiresfurtherediting,itwillbereturnedforadditionalwork.

Thereaderwill:

 

  • Spendaboutthreehoursonyour project

 

  • Readthemanuscriptforgrammarandpunctuation.Iftheprojectdoesnotmeet graduateschoolstandards,itwillbereturned
  • Makegeneralcommentsaboutspecificerrorsthatrequirecorrection

 

  • Checkthattheformatconformstothestandardsandmodelsshowninthishandbook

 

  • Checkthatin-textandendreferencesfollowAPAorotheracceptableformats

 

TheDepartmentofPsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnelwillcontactthestudentwhenthe readerhasreviewedtheproject.YoumaypickitupattheDepartmentoffice.Anycorrectionsindicated mustbemadeasquicklyaspossible,afterwhichthemanuscriptisre-submittedtotheDepartmentof PsychologyAcademicSupportpersonnelforsubmissionforanotherreview.Itisimportanttocomplete thisprocessquickly,sothatcreditwillbereceived forcompletingtheproject.

Thefollowingarecommonerrorstoavoid:

 

  1. 1. Incorrectmargins

 

  1. 2. Incorrectplacementofheadings

 

  1. 3. HeadingsnotconsistentwiththeTableofContents

 

  1. 4. Incorrectspacing

 

  1. 5. WidevariationofstylesfortheTableofContents

 

  1. 6. IncorrectstyleinReferencesections

 

  1. 7. Notnumbering pagesthrough totheendoftheAppendix

 

  1. 8. Useofanapostropheindates,i.e.,use1990sinsteadof1990’s

 

  1. 9. Inclusionand sequenceoffrontpages

 

10.Useoffirstperson

 

AdditionalTips

 

  1. 1. Youshouldmeetweekly (ataminimum)withyourfacultysponsoYoushouldbereceiving ongoing feedbackon yourideasandprogress.
  2. 2. Consultwithasmanyotherpeopleinthediscipline(intheDepartmentandatotherinstitutions)

 

as possible.

 

 

  1. 3. Usethelanguageofyourresearcharea,butavoidunnecessaryjargon.

 

 

  1. 4. MakearealistictimetableandstickThiswillensurethatyouhavetimetocompleteall thatyouwantto,withoutcomingtotheendwithlittletimeandmuchworkstilltobedone.Itis importantnottofeelrushedinordertoensureyourbesteffort.Inparticular,giveyourself

ampletimetoanalyzedataand writetheFinalPaper.

 

 

  1. 5. WritetheFinal Paperasaresearcherinpsychologywouldwriteforpublicationinaresearch journThiswillsaveyouagreatdealofworkwhenyousubmittheworktoajournal.
  2. 6. AskotherpsychologymajorstoreadyourFinalPaperandprovideyoufeedb

 

AppendixF:GuidelinesforHumanSubjectResearch

 

Philosophy

 

UnionCollege,asaChristianlearningcommunity,seekstoupholdthevalueoftheindividual andtotreatotherswithdignityandrespect.Thesubjecthastherighttoinformedconsent,minimalrisk beyondthatnormallyencounteredindailylife,privacy,andcompetenceoftheresearcher.

Definition

 

Humansubjects:Individual aboutwhomaninvestigatorconductingresearchobtainsthrough eitherinterventionofinteractionwiththeindividual,orthroughrecordofidentifiableprivate information.

Guidelines

 

  1. 1. Humansubjectresearchconductedby studentsmustbeapprovedaccordingtostatedpo

 

  1. 2. Thepurposeoftheresearchmustbeforthrightlystat

 

  1. 3. Principlesofconfidentialitymustbemaintain

 

  1. 4. Exposuretocertainrisksmustbeacknowledgedifpresentandmustbeminimized.

 

  1. 5. Informedconsentproceduresmustbe maintainSubjectsmustbeaware:

 

  1. Ofthepurposeoftheassessmentactivity b. Oftheproceduresinvolved
  2. Ofanyrisks,discomforts,orcosts tothesubject d. Ofthebenefitsoftheresearch
  3. Ofwhowillhaveaccesstotheinformationgainedandhowlongitwillberetained

 

  1. Thatparticipationisvoluntaryandtheycanstopparticipationintheprojectatanytime

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