Case Study: Lola From a Traits Perspective

Personality psychology is the focus of some of the best-known psychology theories. To illustrate the discipline’s different theories and approaches to individuality, you will examine the application of several theories to the case of a young woman we call Lola. In this case study assignment, you will hear from Lola, as well as from some of the significant people in her life.

Instructions

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Note: This assignment will focus on Lola’s case study from a traits perspective. When accessing the Case Study: Lola presentation (link in the Resources), go to the Unit 1 tab to get the information you need for this assignment.

Complete the following:

Describe the major personality traits we see in Lola and identify how they might have developed. Use both the five-factor model of personality and Eysenck’s hierarchical model of personality.
Explain which theory best describes Lola.
Include a description of both models, as well as all five factors and Eysenck’s broad three traits.

Read the scoring guide for this assessment before submitting it. When you are done, submit your assessment to faculty.

Additional Requirements
References: Support your paper with one current peer-reviewed and scholarly resource not more than five years old.
Length: Ensure your paper is 2–3 pages in length, excluding the title page and reference page.
Format: Use current APA style guidelines.
LOLA

I’m Lola. Where do I come from? What are my roots? I’ve often wondered. The facts are simple enough, but the feelings are not. Objectively, it all started twenty years ago, when my father (a warm, loving, teddy-bear character) and my mother (a pretty, icy princess) welcomed me into their arms (I hope). Soon after, they extended another welcome to my sister Emily. As soon as Emily and I were both in school, my mother went back to work. She is a researcher for Jax Enterprises. We moved around a lot when I was little, and I remember being pretty lonely and not having many friends. There didn’t seem to be time for family outings or gatherings. I guess we weren’t that important to my parents.

In sixth grade things really clicked! I got fantastic grades. I always did well in school. I had some friends, but most of my classmates were very jealous of me. Through a contest in a local department store I got into modeling children’s clothes. I loved the attention and the extra clothes. I was the envy of all the kids in school, and I got a kick out of showing them my photo album. The pictures were amazing!

Then the bubble burst. I started turning into myself and often hated what I saw. In seventh grade, I was miserable. That’s when my weight problem started. I didn’t have acne, at least, but I didn’t have dates or boyfriends either. At the end of the year, I transferred to an all girls’ school. I made one or two friends, but nothing serious or meaningful. Everyone was always so weird to me. I think most of the girls were jealous of me—they weren’t models, and nothing special really. Some of them acted nice to me, but I know it was because they wanted to know private things about me—things that I don’t share with anyone. What really excited me was painting and music (piano). The school had excellent teachers and facilities, and I really gave it everything I had until I graduated from high school. When I was playing the piano I was out of time, out of space, soaring with the notes. In painting, I was lost in colors—I felt I was actually moving in and out of the canvas. I went from one to the other and felt totally fulfilled and everything seemed right with the world.

When I graduated high school, I decided to go east to college and was accepted at Williams College. The dorm food was so awful, so I lost a little weight. I worked really hard and got good grades in the classes I cared about, but I broke out into a sweat every time I had to take an exam. I worried a lot about essay exams, but the objective ones really knocked me out. My sophomore year, I went out with a boy from Harvard, and I thought I was in love. At last, I was in a genuine relationship. He was so sweet to me. He told me I was smart and beautiful. He made me feel special at first, but then after about six months he became cruel. I think he was cheating on me, but he denied it. I think he was lying all along.

When we broke up, I just fell apart, and so did my world. I’d wake up at night with terrible nightmares. During the day, I just couldn’t concentrate—perhaps I didn’t even want to. I had trouble sleeping at night and drank whole quarts of hot chocolate with marshmallows—trying to fill up the empty places. I gained weight and couldn’t look at myself in a mirror. I had trouble studying, got very scared in exams, and started cutting classes. My grades got so bad, I was put on probation. I couldn’t decide what to major in and didn’t think any department would want me as a major anyway.

People are always telling me how beautiful I am, but I’m not always sure they’re being sincere. I think they want something from me and they are just trying to be nice to get over on me. I know that I am pretty, but why are they saying these things? It just doesn’t make sense.

I still don’t have a major—I don’t even have a meaning. How can someone decide what field to concentrate in until they know what they want to be? I’m still searching. I’m thinking seriously about dropping out of school—at least for a while until I find out. But if I drop out of school, I will have to leave the dorm and I won’t have anywhere to live. Where will I go? The dorm gives me a place to stay and three meals each day so I really can’t leave, can I?

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